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On November 13, Ms. Carrion participated in the 2019 Great American Teach-In where she discussed the importance of understanding child labor laws and provided local elementary school students with information regarding the federal and state laws that protect them.

Yesterday, Associate Attorney, Daniela Carrion had the pleasure of participating in the 2019 Great American Teach-In at a local elementary school. Ms. Carrion discussed the importance of understanding child labor laws and provided students with information regarding the federal and state laws that protect them. The students interpreted scenarios that highlighted issues in the youth workforce and examined the appropriate protocol and solutions.

Ms. Carrion discusses youth labor rights with students from a local middle school class.

Child labor laws are enforced and regulated by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the U.S. Department of Labor to protect the health, education, and welfare of minors in the workplace. Below is an outline regarding child labor laws defined by the State of Florida and the FLSA:

CHILD LABOR LAWS
The FLSA sets the minimum wage for non-agricultural employment at 14 years old. Visit the U.S. Department of Labor’s website to learn more about how the FLSA labor provisions and state child labor laws apply here. The basic minimum rate (per hour) is $8.46.

AGES 14-15

  • Minors may not work during school hours
  • May work up to 15 hours per week
  • Not before 7 AM or after 7 PM
  • No more than 3 hours a day on school days M-F.
  • May work up to 8 hours on Friday, Saturday and Sunday until 9 PM

    The FLSA determines that the daily maximum amount of hours that can be worked is 3 hours on school days with a weekly maximum of 18 hours. 

    AGES 16-17

  • May not work during school hours unless they hold a waiver from a public school, Child Labor Compliance, or enrolled in high school work programs
  • May work up to 30 hours per week
  • May not work before 6:30 AM or later than 11 PM
  • Nore more than 8 hours a day
  • On days when school does not follow, there are no hour restrictions

Minors under the under the age of 18 years old are prohibited by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to work in any occupation that it deems to be hazardous:

  • Operating motor vehicles
  • Operating power-driven equipment or machinery
  • Working with toxic substances
  • Manufacturing occupations
  • Electrical occupations

PENALTIES
Violations of Florida Child Labor law may result in fines up to $2,500 per offense and can be deemed as a second-degree misdemeanor. Also, the FLSA states that maximum fines up to $11,000 can be issued per minor/per violation.


Additional Resources: